Welcome to My Longarm Quilter

I grew up in Loveland Colorado and I am currently living in Fort Collins Colorado with my husband. I am a mother and grandmother! I started sewing in High School and made my own clothes. When my daughters arrived I enjoyed sewing beautiful dresses for them!

At the encouragement of my dear sister, I began quilting! It is a joy taking a beautiful quilt top and making the beauty stand out! Every quilt is truly a family heirloom!

I have had over 40 hours of one on one professional longarm training from a professional longarm instructor & quilter. I am always having continuous training through workshops, videos and one on one training.   I am very particular with my quilts, quality quilting is very important to me!

General Information & Tips

* Make sure your backing fabric and you batting are at 8 inches longer and 8 inches wider than your quilt top.

How much binding fabric do I need?

Measure the Quilt Top length and width.
Determine amount fabric required:

[(Length+Width) x 2] + 15" = Total Linear Inches
With the above calculation result, see the chart below for fabric requirements.

  • 132" requires 1/4 yard
  • 202" requires 3/8 yard
  • 272" requires 1/2 yard
  • 342" requires 5/8 yard
  • 412" requires 3/4 yard
  • 482" requires 7/8 yard
  • 552" requires 1 yard

How many quilt blocks do I need to make my quilt?

Twin Size Quilt

Block SizeAcross x DownTotal BlocksFinished Size
12"6 x 95472"x108"
15"5 x 73575"x105"
16"5 x 73580"x112"
18"4 x 82472"x108"

Full Size Quilt

Block SizeAcross x DownTotal BlocksFinished Size
12"8 x 97296"x108"
15"6 x 74290"x105"
16"6 x 74296"x112"
18"5 x 63090"x108"

Queen Size Quilt

Block SizeAcross x DownTotal BlocksFinished Size
12"8 x 97296"x108"
15"6 x 74290"x105"
16"6 x 74296"x112"
18"5 x 63090"x108"

King Size Quilt

Block SizeAcross x DownTotal BlocksFinished Size
12"9 x 1090108"x120"
15"7 x 856105"x120"
16"7 x 749112"x112"
18"6 x 638108"x108"

Spray starch or sizing gives incredible results!  It helps control fabric while cutting, sewing, and pressing.  If you have trouble with wavy borders, uneven blocks, bias cuts, or just want a truly 'perfect' result...use starch or sizing every time your fabric touches the iron.  My favorite brand is Best Pressed.

If possible, quilt backing seams that are horizontal rather vertical are easier to handle on the quilt frame. However, don't change your design to suit horizontal seams...I do a nice job whichever way the seams run!

When piecing your quilt back, cut off the selvage edges in the seam area. Selvage edges have a much tighter weave and can cause puckering if left in the quilt.

Darker stray threads can appear beneath lighter-colored fabric in the quilting process. To keep these threads in place, extra starch or sizing may help them stay in place.